Things 'n' Stuff

i can haz tumblr nao?

the-unpopular-opinions:

One of these women is despised and hated for being awkward.
The other is applauded and worshipped for the exact same reason.
I know other factors come into play.
But something isn’t right there.

the-unpopular-opinions:

One of these women is despised and hated for being awkward.

The other is applauded and worshipped for the exact same reason.

I know other factors come into play.

But something isn’t right there.

(via colonelgeorgespunmercy)

Drake Grants 15-Year-Old Brain Cancer Patient Kennedy Brown’s Wish

goodblacknews:

Drake Grants 15-Year-Old Brain Cancer Patient Kennedy Brown’s Wish

Drake Grants Brain Cancer Patient's Wish

If you haven’t already figured it our from his music, hip-hop/pop star Drake has a really big heart and we’re super happy to see him share it in this way.

Last night, 15-year-old Kennedy Brown got the surprise of her life when Drizzy showed up on her doorstep unexpectedly. According to ABC News, Kennedy, who’s currently in hospice, was diagnosed with brain cancer two years ago, but this weekend…

View On WordPress

(via frantzfandom)

“In social justice, there’s this absurd meme (that I’ve been guilty of myself) is that we are the “voice for the voiceless,” but that’s not right. The oppressed are not voiceless – they’re just not being listened to.”

—   

Dianna Anderson, of Be the Change, at Rachel Held Evans’ “Ask a Feminist” (via emm-in-sem)

Wooo, I like this. 

(via iamateenagefeminist)

Perfect quote is perfect.

(via cand86)

Gonna print this out and stick it on my mirror. Keep that shit in check.

(via ishkwaakiiwan)

Or that one is “GIVING” a voice to a marginalized person. Which is very problematic as well. Having a voice is different to not being heard.

(via newwavefeminism)

And always remember that our ‘voices’ are not always spoken word, there are many ways to communicate and they should all be respected

(via colonelgeorgespunmercy)

(Source: dandelionbreaks, via colonelgeorgespunmercy)

sourcedumal:

total-queer-move:

LOOK. IT’S EVERY SINGLE STEREOTYPE ABOUT MEN’S RIGHTS ACTIVISTS PUT INTO ONE HANDY-DANDY DEMOGRAPHICS SURVEY SO IT CAN BE STATISTICALLY VALIDATED!! [x]

THANKS R/MENSRIGHTS!!

So young white males whinging about how society disadvantages them. Not. Surprised. At. All

i’m taking a poetry class and i’m not sure if i want to start posting my poems on tumblr, facebook or whatever or if i just want to go all Emily Dickinson about it and horde them until i die and they’re discovered by the relatives and/or city workers going through the stacks of my stuff covering every surface in the house (if the legions of cats haven’t clawed and/or chewed them to oblivion after eating my body, that is).

bluejamjarart:

Aristohumans

bluejamjarart:

Aristohumans

(via frantzfandom)

breadprincess:

gold-star-4-trying:

In case you were feeling sad.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this today and I DON’T EVEN CARE

breadprincess:

gold-star-4-trying:

In case you were feeling sad.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this today and I DON’T EVEN CARE

(via colonelgeorgespunmercy)

Favourite People: Steve Buscemi
↳ "When I get cast, I always flip to the end of the script to see if my character gets beaten up or killed."

(via shannibal-cannibal)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Thomas Alleman.

Dancing in the Dragon Jaws.

Dancing in the Dragons Jaws is Los Angeles-based photographer Thomas Alleman’s profound and nuanced body of work taken of San Francisco’s broader gay community during the mid-1980s. Working as a newspaper photographer for The Sentinel at the time, he was given the time and liberty that all sociopolitical relevant issues—including those of the present day—deserve. After shelving this work for over a decade, Alleman went back in 2009 to uncover and scan images that he’d previously overlooked.

Intermixed with images of galas, glitter, and glam are also images that show the severity of the struggle facing San Francisco’s gay community in the mid-80s. Alleman recalls, “We reported and photographed a blizzard of protests and demonstrations, vigils and marches and sit-ins, as the community struggled for social and political recognition of the crisis. But not every drumbeat was martial, of course. Often it was syncopated and disco-y, and I watched countless partiers dance to it with a shimmy and a bounce, and with life-affirming joy. While many of the pictures demonstrate a community in lamentation, many others are about anger and resolve, and most are about love and life. And disco and drag.”

Because of this range in depiction, because of the patience shown for the fight, because of the far-reaching concern shown for one another—whether dressed in a suit or in drag—Alleman shows us a human issue, not just an LGBT one. Therein lies this collection’s heart. Furthermore, Alleman reminds us of “that moment in our social history—so long ago, and so very recent—when the first wave of the AIDS epidemic crashed onto one of our country’s most vibrant neighborhoods. And, while that tribe convulsed with well-earned fear, heartbreak and anger, some still found the courage and the will to celebrate the dream of life they’d come to San Francisco for, and they danced in the dragon’s jaws.”

Website

(via lgbtlaughs)